Tuesday, September 18, 2012



Every native culture comes to an end when an exotic mindset enters & penetrate the local people. West Bengal is a place where BHUMIPUTRAS faced the same problem in last 70-80 years , it was initiated from the late 1930”s still now this trend is going on. Today I will discuss about the glorious historical achievements what our ancestors had done in the soil of west Bengal & specially in Howrah district. History has always proved that immigration, multiculturalism is always a big scourge to the indigenes, west Bengal has the same problem from a long time as it existed  in the extreme eastern part of India, which is closer to many countries border & also the gateway of india via the eastern region so centuries after centuries foreigner target this area to enter.
Once upon a time in the ancient medieval period a glorious congenital Hindu kingdom dispersed  across what are now Howrah and Hooghly districts in the Indian state of West Bengal. Which was known as the Bhurshut Kingdom, Bhurshut kingdom grew up in the southern parts of Rarh region.

It had a high concentration of Bhurisresthis, a community of traders and as such came to be called Bhurshut. However, it was possibly the main centre of Rarhi Brahmins. It could have been ruled by a Sur king during the period when the Pala Empire was a rising force. Different feudatory kings may have ruled over the kingdom. At a later time there is mention in folklore of a Dhibar dynasty, possibly in the 14th–15th century. Subsequently the area came to be ruled by a Brahmin family.
Shanibhangar, the last Dhibar king of Burshut, was defeated by Chaturanan Neogi of Garh Bhawanipur. Chaturanan’s grandson (by his daughter) Krishna Roy of the Mukhti royal family of Phulia took over the reins and established the Brahmin dynasty of Bhurshut. Krishna Roy ruled in 1583–84, at a time when Akbar was the Mughal emperor. Krishna Roy’s great-grandson Pratap Narayan Roy (ruled around 1652–1684) was the greatest of Bhurshut kings. There is mention about the exemplary bravery of a lady of the family, popularly referred to as Roy Baghini, but it is difficult to identify the person. She is probably named Bhabashankari.
In Ain-i-Akbari it is mentioned that amongst the thirty-one mahals under Sirkar Suleimanabad, the highest revenue was earned by Basandhari pargana, followed by Bhurshut. No other pargana under Sirkar Satgaon or Sirkar Mandaran earned so much revenue. Bhurshut was conquered by Kirtichand Rai of Bardhaman in the 18th century.
Bhushut kingdom had three forts at Garh Bhabanipur, Pandua (Pedo or Pedo Basantapur) and Rajbalhat. There is hardly any trace of these forts, There still is a place called Dihi Bhurshut in Howrah district, across the Damodar  from Rajbalhat.
Bharatchandra Ray, ‘Raygunakar’, 18th-century Bengali poet, hailed from Pedo Bhurshut and possibly belonged to the ruling family of Bhurshut kingdom.


Once the bhumiputras of west Bengal had ruled the whole howrah & Hooghly district in a very progressive way that was our glorious past.Now the situation has changed north howrah is dying  & central howrah was captured by the non bengalees ages ago & also Communists had wiped out the nationalistic history of howrah & Hooghly in a shrude way.Shall we accept this as our fate or shall we allow exotic people to arrogate our territory in a silence way ? . A silence cultural ethnic cleansing is occurring all over west Bengal whether you believe it or not we had lost our pride & old status which has to revived at any cost.The sons of soil of west Bengal is now  heading towards annihilation.Only a culture can coexist when multiculturalism will respect the natives as the progenitor of that land, but alas the biharis,bangals, non bengalees they always force us to live our life in their way they don’t integrate with mainstreme BHUMIPUTRA CULTURE, The way Europe is now thinking their problem we need to comply that path otherwise our situation will be like the Armenians , the way they lost their homeland & culture we are gonna face that in same way.This situation has sprang up because of the sloppiness of the First Generation Bhumiputras towards protecting primeval interest  from the period of 1930s & and the post Partion of British India ERA in west Bengal.The way the marathis agnized the importance of protecting endemic interests we shall have to follow their way, the BHUMIPUTRAS of West Bengal  should not imitate the extraneous culture from strangers otherwise it will wipe out  native Bengali hindu culture in a draconian way.We shall have to raise our all issues at national & international levels to appeal the 290  million sons of the soil of west Bengal for defending  the indigenous rights of the BHUMIPUTRAS OF WEST BENGAL.We admit the existence of outlanders at the leaps and bounds of west Bengal almost everywhere of this Indian state.Seculerists,Communists,Muslims,Christians and Non Bengalees will claim this is an Indian territory everyone should live here with equal rights.The fact is if we look at the natives of every culture, we will intromit one truth that is the importance of  indigens, but alas what happened with west Bengal Bhumiputras that should not happen with any native population this is my utmost request to any indigens of any country or also to The Sons of Soil Of West Bengal Please Wake Up Stop Sleeping Fight For The Existence Fight For The Rights Until You Revive It.

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Launch of a non-profit socio-cultural organisation & Its Blog

  1. We are cordially declaring that we have launched a non-profit
    socio-cultural organisation with an aim to rewrite the glorious past
    of Bangabhumi and to re-establish the greatness of the Bengalee
    people. The name of the organization is Bangiya Itihas o Sanskriti Anusandhan Samiti ( BISAS ).
  2. Visitors can see our blog at this following url : http://bisasbangla.blogspot.in/ .

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Pura Ulun Danu

This temple is dedicated to the Goddess of the Lake, Devi Danu, and her consort Vishnu, who rules over water. This is one of the two main subak temples in Bali which determine how water reaches the irrigation ditches all over southern Bali. These waters, enriched with volcanic minerals from the Batur highlands, lead from one terrace to another in descending steps to the sea.

The Sacred Monkey Forest , Ubud, Bali .

Sacred Monkey Forest of Padangtegal during the mid-14th century. It is possible that this temple was built by the Pejeng Dynasty (the Pejeng Dynasty was centred on Bali in the vicinity of Ubud and was conquered by the Majapahit empire in A.D. 1343).

Gunung Kawi

After Goa Gajah, this Vishnu Temple is said to be the second oldest temple in Bali built around 11th century. Much of the place still intact except the entrance part which in ruins due to earth quake. The rock cut and chiselled shrines are of rock mountain. There are so many alters but all the statues are gone, either kept in secret by villagers and some in Bali museum. Legend says that temple is built for king Udayana, his Javanese queen Guna Pria Dharma Patni, his concubine, his oldest son Airlangga who ruled East Java , and his youngest son Anak Wungsu. Anak Wungsu ruled on Bali from 1050 to 1077. The four temples on the west side of the river should then have been built for the chief concubines of Anak Wungsu.

Village of Yeh Pulu

The picture on the left has small pond which in ancient times used by the Kings wives and princess as playground. Picture on the right - The relief carving in Yeh Pulu depicts the daily life of island people its fully chiselled on rock wall for about 25 meters and some parts depicts Krishna’s manifestations. Dating 14th Century.

The Goa Gajah or the Elephant Caves

The Goa Gajah, also known as the Elephant caves, which dates back to at least the 11th century, was excavated in 1922. Not far from the central Bali town of Ubud is Goa Gajah, popularly known as the Elephant Cave. The cave is a former hermitage for the eleventh century Hindu priests.

A huge face at the entrance of the cave for ascetics. All around are fantastically carved leaves, animals, waves and humans running from mouth in fear. Inside is a 43 ft long passage, which stops at a T-junction, 49 ft wide. The inner sanctum contains several niches, which could have served as sleeping compartments for ascetics. At the one end of the passage is a statue of Ganesha.